Jump to content

Recommended Posts

3 years ago I gave some equipment to a friend to store for me and I just picked it back up.  99% of everything looks great, but it appears my RKV was left out on a shelf (unplugged) and has accumulated quite a bit of dust.  Before I fire it back up any suggestions on how to get it relatively clean?  Would not look forward to scraping out a ton of dust with a Q-tip.

 

 

IMG_0075.jpg

IMG_0077.jpg

IMG_0079.jpg

IMG_0080.jpg

IMG_0081.jpg

 

 

IMG_1116.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of passes with this from about arm's length should take care of the dust that is able to be blown off.  I use one to clean out my computer.  You could then use a Q-Tip for any surface that you want immaculate.  Canned air can be a bit dangerous if accidentally used upside down so that liquid could spray out.  

Edited by roadtonowhere08
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't appear to be caked on - just accumulated dust from sitting on a shelf.  Thought about completely removing it from the chassis to give it a good once over.  Doesn't look too difficult, but I may just see what I can do with Q-Tips and tech wipes.  I work for a station that uses something other than Isopropyl alcohol to clean video heads as well as other items.  Smells nastier than anything I've ever used before and when I get any on my hands it leaves a white film.  When I go in on Monday I'll find out exactly what it's called.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Carbon Tetrachloride is good if the grime is greasy.

 

For yours, just a blow out with a reversed vacuum cleaner and a soft bristled paint brush about 2.5cm wide should get most of the dust off.

 

Do it in the back yard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Isopropyl alcohol doesn’t leave a film, if all the flux is removed. So you need to give it a good couple of cleans, to flush all the flux of the boards. 

 

I can see a few solder joints that haven’t been cleaned properly and have flux residue. 

 

Something that air cannot remove...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Canned air costs money, some vacuums have an air outlet  where you can plug the hose into.

 

Since the amp is low voltage, the flux isn't such a problem as in Stax driveable amps, but does show bad manufacture practice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of passes with this from about arm's length should take care of the dust that is able to be blown off.

 

I have a Metro car vac kit and it's quite amazing.  They are usually overpowered and the company has an old-school reputation for having good products.  For me, this would be a good way to finally stop buying canned air at costco.  

 

Anyway, this would be my vote for what do to - just blow it out.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

The chemical we use at work to clean video and audio heads is called Trichloroethylene.  I've used Isopropyl and 100% denatured alcohol to clean before, but never this stuff.  Smells pretty caustic compared to the other 2.  Anyone know anything about it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

As always, start by making sure nothing is holding a charge... Observe proper HV precautions! 

 

TCE is primarily a degreaser. Probably not necessary here. 

 

If you have access to a keyboard vacuum or other similarly precise *low power* vacuum cleaner with a brush tip, I would lean towards that. Second choice would be *gentle* blowing. I would not resort to chemicals unless you want to take the whole thing apart which sounds like an epic pain in the ass. Before you vacuum/blow take the tubes out so you can really get the vacuum/blower everywhere. While the tubes are out clean them off, because tubes should look pretty and shiny, but not for any reason of performance. If you care about the markings on the tubes be VERY gentle when cleaning, and avoid solvents unless absolutely necessary - you can probably get the tubes clean enough with just a few drops of water and a clean napkin.

 

Dust is not a problem until it forms a blanket thick enough to be a thermal insulator, and you are nowhere near that point. The big exception being if it is metallic dust from metalworking but I'm assuming (there I go...) that this is conventional home/office dust so, yea, it's just ugly. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good!  I kinda miss my RKV.  Not enough to replace it, just a twinge of regret now and then.

I got it pretty dirt cheap - think I paid $350 for it off of Audiogon. At the time there weren't a lot of amps that could run the AKG K1000s off of the jack. Still have those but don't really listen to them. Was too tight of a fit on my head.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...

Bumping up the thread... has anyone run speakers off of the Impedancer?  I was given a pair of Emotiva T1s and don't really have an amp to run them.  The specs on the speakers are:

 

Efficiency: 88 dB (2.83V/1m).
Power handling: 150W continuous / 300W peak.
Nominal impedance: 4 ohms.
Frequency response: 37 Hz – 28 kHz (+3/-3 dB).
Crossover (midrange / tweeter): 2700 Hz, 12 dB / octave
Crossover (woofer / midrange): 275 Hz, 12 dB / octave
Dual speaker terminals for bi-amping or bi-wiring.

 

Would this work or would it tax the RKV?

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're serious and not tongue-in-cheek, the specs on the RKV Mk III through the "impedance" (transformer) give just over 1 watt into 8 ohms.  It's not specified for 4 ohms, but that is a tougher load.  You should be able to figure it out from there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...