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mwl168

Technical Assistance/Advice Thread

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Do I understand correctly that most of these issues can be effectively resolved or drastically minimized  if we don't expect to have the music played real time as do the LP playback? 

What I mean is that if the digital signal transmitted from the play back device is buffered at the DAC end where measures can be employed to "re-align" and cleanse the data before feeding the conversion circuits, similar to how digital data is transmitted between computers, then the effect of digital cable can be eliminated as long as they are properly spec'ed? 

Or am I over-simplifying things?   

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I can tell you that I used a $5 usb cable from Amazon in my setup for a year or so.  I figured there was enough isolation and reclocking in the Amanero/Chronos/Rhea stack that a better cable wouldn't matter.  I was able to get a hold of an Audioquest Cinnamon USB cable for $35 out of pocket so I thought let me try it.  I'll tell you I tried to remain as objective as humanly possible but I heard a positive difference with the better quality cable.

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Does anyone have any tips for building an enclosure?

I need to make one for a CFA. How do I go about mounting the transistors to the heat sinks?

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12 hours ago, vivolo said:

 How do I go about mounting the transistors to the heat sinks?

You really have two options when it comes to mounting resistors to heat sinks:

1.  mount the transistors directly to the heat sink which requires you to drill and tap the heatsink

2.  mount the transistors to an aluminum angle then mount the angle to the heatsink

Of the two options, I would opt for option 2 when possible.

Drilling and tapping the heat sink is tricky and unforgiving. If you make a mistake like broken the tapper while tapping the heat sink, you may be forced to abandon that heat sink altogether.

Drilling and tapping (optional) 3mm- thick aluminum angle (which I typically use) is much simpler and forgiving. Aluminum angle is also easier and cheaper to replace.

I speak from personal experience. 

 

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You still have to drill and tap the heat sink (preferably blind holes) to mount the angle to it. The mount directly to the sink method would work well for the least thermal resistance IF you are good at drilling fairly precisely AND you aren’t prone to breaking taps. Something like the Shars drill guide helps as well (though I haven’t used mine yet.)


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For lower current and heat I use aluminum cases and mount the transistors to the case bottom.  Then secured with a 4-40 hex head screw and locknut

For higher current and heat I use the angle iron method mounted to the case bottom then mount the heatsink to the angle iron.

When tapping the heatsinks it's best to use cutting fluid.  WD-40 works fine if you don't have cutting fluid.  Take care to back the tap out a half turn or so for each two full turns.  This will break off the metal pieces that bind taps when you're cutting the threads. 

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59 minutes ago, Pars said:

You still have to drill and tap the heat sink (preferably blind holes) to mount the angle to it. 

Good point.

I should have mentioned that I mount the aluminum angle to the heat sink using M5 screws, which, in my experience, on top of having fewer holes to work with, is much easier to tap and far less likely to break the tapper. 

I drill the mounting halls on the angle slightly larger than the M5 screw diameter to provide some margin of error so I don't need to be as precise when I drill and tap the heat sink.. 

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2 hours ago, mwl168 said:

2.  mount the transistors to an aluminum angle then mount the angle to the heatsink

 

For convenience, I also believe that it is the best option in most cases.

If I have to do few holes, I don't mind practicing them directly on the heat sink, but here you have to be much more careful… although after having done those of the CFAe I can already do anything.

 

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I like to start my blind holes on a heat sink (or any thing else) with a thru hole tap and then finish with a closed end tap.  this

allows the threads to be better formed deeper in the hole.

I use a drill press set to the proper depth to avoid drilling all the way through but a hand drill with tape wound around the drill bit

at the proper depth works also, just a little less precise.

Me

 

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Check this video by Haas:

You may want a special tapping drill to make thread go deeper in the limited depth of blind hole.

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I found this guy's channel. I did not know where to share it so I have put it in this thread in case someone is useful.

It has enough videos on how to build planar speakers.

I think it's quite interesting.

 

 

 

 

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