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What are you EATING right now?


JBLoudG20
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In addition to tomatillos or in my case green tomatoes, Nate suggested this basic recipe: Add a green bell pepper, a poblano, a jalapeno, 4 cloves of garlic, and an onion to the mix, wash/peel every thing and put it all in the oven on a foil lined plan (i cut everything in halves or quarters).  Blacken until the skin is basically coming off the peppers.  Remove, skin the peppers, combine in a food processor, blend, and then transfer to a pot.  Separately cube 1-1/2 lbs of pork, mix with salt/pepper and then dust with flour.  Heat a pan w/ olive oil and brown pork on all sides.  Combine with veggies and simmer for a few hours.  Add chicken stock to desired thick/thinness.  I make it like a stew and serve over rice but it'd make a mean taco or burrito filling or on nachos or basically whatever.

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In truth, Peter, I've been known to use the slow-cooked carnitas pork with the base recipe as well but it's different/better with the pan-browned pork cubes.  

Glad it turned out to your liking, Al.  It's a family favorite that I got from another mexican-food-loving friend.  I've never put it in a burrito like that but it looks yummy!

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Your recipe makes excellent chili verde, and Steve was serious about his Guatemalan coworkers. He told the three of them that he was going to a friend's for chili verde and they somewhat jokingly asked if they could join him. I sent back mini burritos and they said it was damn good for a gringo. 

The green tomatoes were so green that I had to add a little sugar and lime juice to cut the acid edge. It worked well. 

I also used Persian lime olive oil to brown the meat because we had a dab left. That added a little touch too. 

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Spanish cured meats, peppers and olive appetizers

DFA65C36-4A7C-4D85-8A63-081392265C83.thumb.jpeg.94148060dd2fb58221e280c825017498.jpeg

From left to right: Jamón Serrano, Sliced Cecina, Jamón ibérica de bellata (and a few slices of Chorizo), Paleta ibérica de bellata, Chorizo

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From left to right: Wood fire roasted whole piquillo peppers, Anchovy stuffed olives, Piparra peppers

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Nice selection, Jim.  Some of that jamón is bellota (acorn), it means the porks were fed with acorn and not any kind of animal processed food. Ibérico refers to the pork's race. Pure ibérico 100% is what we call "pata negra" (black hoof), it's becoming rarer and more expensive, but 50% ibérico (half of the animal's blood from an "ibérico" ancestor) is pretty good too. Cecina is awesome too, it's made from cow or veal's leg, cured in a similar way as pork's legs are cured to make jamón.

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Happy New Year Al, Steve and Antonio. 

@Antonio - the cecina was beef not veal. I wanted to order the veal but it would not have arrived in time for New Year’s Eve. This was my New Years surprise for the family and based upon how fast it was consumed, was a great success. Thanks for the reminder.

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2 hours ago, Torpedo said:

Nice selection, Jim.  Some of that jamón is bellota (acorn), it means the porks were fed with acorn and not any kind of animal processed food. Ibérico refers to the pork's race. Pure ibérico 100% is what we call "pata negra" (black hoof), it's becoming rarer and more expensive, but 50% ibérico (half of the animal's blood from an "ibérico" ancestor) is pretty good too. Cecina is awesome too, it's made from cow or veal's leg, cured in a similar way as pork's legs are cured to make jamón.

Would venture to say that I like pata negra as much as anything else in the world that isn't either made from grapes or commonly showcased in a bikini.

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8 hours ago, Voltron said:

Happy New Year Antonio!

Happy new year, guys. Not much of a celebration yesterday, just the 12 grapes and a toast with the wife. We (as in all Spain) have this silly tradition of eating a grape with every bell stroke when the clock is hitting 12. We didn't choke.

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