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The Official Head-Case Photography Thread.


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My daughter (almost 12) is on the yearbook staff at her magnet school. Her grade went on a field trip to the Atlanta Aquarium, and she was one of four people allowed to take a camera. I set her up wit

A night out in the rain with the X-Pro2 & XF 23 f/2 

One of the reason I stopped posting was there just seemed to be so much drama. Getting angry and going off because of someone's post is just not a good use of my time. Being offended by these pics is

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From the picture zooming in, it looks like it has a fan but it looks like it has a hinge for a fully articulating screen as well, just like on the Sharp 8K m43 camera, which has been in development for ages and now Sony comes out with it with FF.

I guess it will be only slightly cheaper than the FX6 so still a good distance away from the A7SIII with regards to pricing.

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Okay, this may not be the most efficient way to solve autofocus detection problems (or is it the most efficient?), but definitely someone at Fuji is attacking from a different perspective. 
 

Reminds one of the ever decreasing on-time San Francisco busing rates. After several failed attempts to fix they solved by eliminating the schedule. 

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The polymath John Herschel, nephew of the trailblazing astronomer Caroline Herschel, coined the word photography in 1839 in his correspondence with Henry Fox Talbot — a onetime aspiring artist turned amateur inventor. (The invention of photography and how the new technology revolutionized both art and science occupies Chapter 14 of Figuring, titled “Shadowing the Light of Immortality,” from which this essay is adapted.) For several years, Talbot had been experimenting with techniques for transmuting the impermanence of light and shadow into permanent prints on paper coated with receptive chemicals. But his images failed to last — exposed to natural light, the prints faded over time. Just as he finally perfected the process with help from Herschel, who had proposed using a sodium thiosulfate coating to make the images more permanent, Talbot got word that a French rival by the name of Louis Daguerre had devised an image-making process, which he had named after himself and was planning on presenting at a joint meeting of the Academy of Sciences and the Académie des Beaux Arts in Paris on January 7.

Talbot realized that the revolution he had spent years planning was already afoot and might have another leader. He wrote to Herschel frantically in the last week of January that he must present his own findings before the Royal Society, for “no time ought to be lost, the Parisian invention having got the start of 3 weeks.” He scrambled to rally excitement for his “art of photogenic drawing.”

In a letter of February 28, 1839, Herschel objected to the term “photogeny” to describe Talbot’s new image-making process, noting that it “recalls Van Mons’s exploded theories of thermogen & photogen.” This associative defect, Herschel argued, is amplified by the word’s poetic deficiencies: “It also lends itself to no inflexions & is not analogous with Litho & Chalcography.” Instead, Herschel proposed “photography.” On March 12, he read before the Royal Society a paper titled “Note on the Art of Photography or the Application of the Chemical Rays of Light to the Purposes of Pictorial Representation” — the first public utterance of the word photography.

https://www.brainpickings.org/2019/04/03/virginia-woolf-julia-margaret-cameron-photography/ 

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I've been a bit focused on Garry Winogrand over the last couple of weeks. First to really popularize that 28mm FL, so popular on cell phones, and was a relentless shooter some call "the first digital photographer", though it was all on film. If you don't already know him and are curious, see below. There's a great doc too, trailer first.

 

 

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When I was in fifth grade, my class took a field trip to the George Eastman Museum, in Rochester, New York, as the fifth graders at my rural elementary school, 30 minutes south of the city, did every year. Housed in a Colonial Revival mansion built for the founder of the Eastman Kodak Company in 1905, the museum is home to one of the most significant photography and film collections in the world. But our job there was to stare at old cameras the size of our bodies, marvel at the luxury of having a pipe organ in your house, and write down what a daguerreotype is to prove that we’d been paying attention. At the end of the tour—in a second-story sitting room full of personal artifacts—we were presented, matter-of-factly, with a copy of Eastman’s suicide letter, dated March 14, 1932: “My work is done. Why wait?” Eastman shot himself in the heart with a Luger pistol at the age of 77.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2021/07/kodak-rochester-new-york/619009/

 

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