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After Theodore Millon et. al. - Personality Disorders in Modern Life, I immediately started to read Hervey Cleckley - The Mask Of Sanity. The way he analyze the antisocial personality disorder or so called psychopathy is easily understandable cuz he uses stories of patients or epicrises. Can be interesting read if you are interested in psychology.

And it can be found as pdf on web, legally.

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I don't normally read mainstream fiction novels but this was excellent:

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As was this (back to my normal genre):

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And I'm enjoying this one on audiobook:

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I went to James Gleick's author event @ Powell's in support of this book. It was fun.

 

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On 10/12/2016 at 0:17 PM, MoonShine said:

The sequels are excellent as well: The Dark Forest & The End of Death (just published last month).

Finished The End of Death today.  All 3 were excellent.  Good stories with believable science.

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Nedim Şener - Hrant Dink Assassination and Intelligence Lies.

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While Hrant Dink's killer was on trial for 20 years. Nedim Şener was on trial for 32,5 years because of this book.

Book is a candlelight on Hrant Dink's assassination and how government and his police, ingelligence service got involved in.

I'm sharing some books in Turkish but I really don't know how to reach them in English, or even published in English. But here are some readings which can be helpful:

http://www.gagrule.net/tag/nedim-sener/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_of_Hrant_Dink

Edited by Sechtdamon

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I was collecting books on electronics, how electricty, especially electrostatic, works etc. Mainly old university lecture books... I bought a book recently. I thought it was just an old lecture book. But turns out it is a extremely rare book published in 1939, and only 2000 coppies printed. And mines condition is really good for its age. It was written by Prof. Dr. Georges Bruhat and translated from French to Turkish (well ottoman language; some kind of blend with Turkish, Arabic and Farsi)

It has good basic info about electricty. Hard to understand cuz of its language, but still...

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Edited by Sechtdamon
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After struggling to understand elecricty lessons basically in ottoman language, I've found another very interesting rare book for my taste in English this time:

 

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I guess It'a doctoral thesis, the info it has based on really good sources. Most of the folk do not like İsmet İnönü for the struggle they endure during WW2 but he'd done pretty good job as I know.

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French to Ottoman! Wow - I had no idea that Ottoman was a language.

Could have been worse. In the late 1800's a genius called Pedro Carolino produced a phrase book for Portugese tourists visiting Britain. He did not know any English or French, but he did have a Portugese-French and a French-English dictionary. So he generated a phrasebook of originality and beauty, hauling Portugese into English through two languages unknown to him.

Who can guess at what "To Craunch a Mormoset" could possibly mean.

English as She is Spoke http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30411

Edited by Craig Sawyers
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2 hours ago, Craig Sawyers said:

 

French to Ottoman! Wow - I had no idea that Ottoman was a language

 

Well It's not an offical language sir. Basicly It's Turkish loaded with Arabic and Farsi words. Grammar etc. are nearly the same but, words are %80 different compared the modern Turkish. After alphabethic revolution letters are changed from Arabic letters to Latin letters but language stayed the same, slowly evolved to modern Turkish.

You described that story of book so well, I want to check it. :)

Edited by Sechtdamon
Bug

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61e8B3UWsyL._AA300_.jpg

John Scalzi - Redshirts: A Novel With Three Codas

Listened to the Wil Wheaton narration of this. Man, I love John Scalzi.
 

I'm probably going to get some more Scalzi books, since there's a "Use 4 credits get a 10$ credit" thing going on right now.

**BRENT**

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I finally finished book four of Peter V. Brett's Demon Cycle, posted about it on Facebook, and just the other day, Peter V. Brett himself liked my post.  (fanboy swoon)

Now started more M.R. Forbes on Kindle Unlimited (Balance already finished, 10% into Betrayal) and The Way of Kings.

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Thanks sir for sharing, was a great reading. 

 

Thanks @Tyll Hertsens for literally a lecture. :) It is really informative for a young newbie like me.

But I found a mistake about stax L series pricing you might want to change:

"the Stax SR-L500 ($1425) and Stax SR-L700 ($720)"

Thanks again for your effort and knowledge. 

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It is a wonder we persevered in WW2 with muppets that are so naiive running around. The ship was a lot tighter back then - as an example Bletchley Park, the cipher cracking place, had 10,000 staff, most of which commuted in special trains laid on for the purpose. And said nothing about it to anyone at all; in fact they kept quiet about it for the rest of their lives, until the remaining few opened up about it in the last decade or two. Churchill said of them "The geese that laid the golden egg, and never cackled". And it worked the same way in the US back then. At least that era was when Russian spies were real spies, like Klaus Fuchs on the Manhattan Project and the Russian cell in British Intelligence (The Cambridge Five).

And now, on both sides of the pond, when cyber war is the way a county will be brought to its knees (no power, no transport, no petrol/gas, no water, no food, no hospital care etc etc) we have critically insecure data systems, staffed by clowns and blithering idiots.

Edited by Craig Sawyers
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foundation-trilogy.jpg

Over the past few weeks I re-read the Foundation trilogy for the first time since my freshmen year of college. I suggested them to Brent and he said he didn't like the first book and gave up on the series.

After going through them again I'm amazed how well they still hold up. Yes, the first book isn't the best, but the second and third totally redeem it.

The trilogy is one of the best things to come out of the golden age of sci-fi and stands with the Robot novels as the best things Asimov has ever done.

5/5. Obviously.

Brent, you are an idiot. :P

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