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i'm on a roll... the kgsshv


kevin gilmore
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You find offers to the solutions of the problems you asked openly offensive... Stop trolling.. I offered you a service which you were looking for.. That is all.. I went out of my way to communicate with you as you seemed like a guy looking for a solution. I even offered my phone number in good faith..

I have work study at the University.. I spent half of my time trying to help you yesterday. And you claimed you wanted someone to build it. There's nothing more I can do. You're welcome to post whatever you want.. If you post it up people will see what an absolute prig you were regarding the slew of the information I gave you. That won't make it valid or even intelligent. Good luck with your build. I hope you can pursue your build as desired. I don't doubt you can if you just take the time.

Edited by Hennyo
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You forget to mention your SAS experience on your LinkedIn profile.

Massively off-topic, so apologies to all. But oddly enough my cousin Douglas Newton spent his life in the SAS (actually in special forces Royal Marine Commando - the UK equivalent of a Navy SEAL). Now in his early 60's with support boots (knackered ankles through sprinting everywhere in full combat gear) and two hearing aids ("from spending too long next to things that went bang"). Quite a character.

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OK, so blubliss has proven that a person with absolutely no experience can build a T2 as his first electronic

project ever, and get it to work without killing himself. He did however have the patience (cough cough) and

read enough so that he knew what he needed to do. He also had help from a friend, and another friend in

high places.

The kgsshv is WAY easier to do. I had a chance to look at my notebook, because when i built my 2nd

kgsshv i wrote down how long i spent on various things. I stuffed both amp boards at the same time

and the total time to stuff and solder the 2 boards was 6 hours. The power supply board took an

additional 3 hours. I'm sure that justin can do it in half that amount of time, but most people are likely

to spend twice as much time as i did.

Checking all parts before you stuff and solder them in is pretty much required unless you want to

spend more time fixing it than you did building it. I've seen mislabeled resistors before, and dead

transistors out of the box. The $40 transistor tester is a great idea for this, and a decent 4.5 digit

DVM is also necessary.

Still, there are lots of ways you can get hurt if you don't pay attention. The chassis work and wiring

also takes a bit of time especially if you don't have the right tools.

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I will certainly be doing what you have just advised Dr Gilmore.

However, on top of stuffing the boards, I am a little worried about wiring it up for testing and actual wiring as one wrong connection can mean a whole load of charred parts and not to mention the spraks flying around. Is it possible to have a wiring diagram for double checking purposes to mininise wiring mistakes?

Thank you to the experts in advance.

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x2 Victor Chew's request.

I have been taking my time researching, buying parts, and stuffing the boards. Not to mention extremely helpful tips and posts from Horio, Blubliss, JohnMcClean and LilKnight, amongst others.

Edited by eggil
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Taking your time is really the best piece of advice imo. Part of the fun of DIY, is trying to learn a few things and not just throw something together as quickly as possible. Plus taking some extra time probably leads to fewer mistakes along the way. I wish I would have looked over my front panel one more time, so now I have to live with an "electostatic amplifier". :)

Edited by Horio
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However, on top of stuffing the boards, I am a little worried about wiring it up for testing and actual wiring as one wrong connection can mean a whole load of charred parts and not to mention the spraks flying around. Is it possible to have a wiring diagram for double checking purposes to mininise wiring mistakes?

This phrase has been repeated so often in this thread, it is practically cliche... RESEARCH! If you don't know how to connect the primaries/secondaries of a transformer to match your country's power grid, you probably shouldn't be messing with this project. There are dozens of articles on wiring up power supplies and amplifiers (Our old HF/HW buddy Tangent has some pretty good articles that explains it in a way a first-timer would understand). An incredibly quick google search will show you how to connect an XLR or RCA to an amplifier (with photo diagrams).

This isn't another one of those fool-proof projects you'll find on the other forum where every single thing is laid out for you. KG released the schematics and the pcb files. Someone even went through the trouble of making a BOM. You missed out on the board group-buy, but perhaps there'll be another one when KG releases the new pcb revision. You're pretty much on your own from there.

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^^^THIS.

@VC - If the KGSSHV were a kit, sold with uniform parts, your request would be easy to accomodate.

But it's not.

Many of us will use different interconnects to suit their personal taste, as well as attenuators, switches and transformers.

The connections may differ slightly "from the norm". Color-coding, voltage taps and other things may vary.

Everything you seek is right there in the schematics, drawings and thread texts,

A basic understanding of the concepts mentioned above by DQ is necessary.

You should also know how to identify and orient components on the pc boards.

Please be aware that the high voltages flowing through these circuits is lethal.

It can stop your heart in an instant. A good knowledge of working with HV is necessary.

I'll say it again, research the concepts involved, read the KGSSHV threads here and the KGSS thread at HeadWize.

Take notes. Then ask questions that are more specific to the facet of this topic that your research does not answer.

Nobody here is going to write you a book, but I for one am glad to help if the question is focused.

As far as sparks flying, it happened to me twice during this build. Everything was assembled and wired correctly.

I did take precautions so as not to be electrocuted, but I was careless in the testing phase.

The first time it happened, I hooked up my voltmeter wrong to the power supply output.

I knew how to do it, but didnt double check. The probes were wired as an ammeter from some other previous testing.

When I powered it on - BOOM! Instant short circuit. Result, many transistors and resistors were instantly fried.

The second time it happened was when I slipped with the test probe,

bridging and shorting out two of the traces on the PSU pc board.

This time, I only heard a faint snap and saw a small spark. The damage was done.....again!

(FYI, clip-on hook type miniprobes are safer than the needle point ones I used and subsequently slipped with.)

After much troubleshooting and repeat parts orders, what should have taken a month to complete, took three.

I'm just glad my KGSSHV works now. It was a difficult and rewarding journey.

Building the KGSSHV is not that difficult to complete, just know the basics, research, have patience and double check your every move.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi HD man.

There's a board run going on right now.. If you're looking for a board set, try pm'ing him.

Edit: I think HDman's post was deleted. I think Lil' Knight is doing a board run right now. I forget if the other projects are avaialable.

Edited by Hennyo
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The chassis work and wiring also takes a bit of time especially if you don't have the right tools.

Hi Kevin:

I am scratching my head for the casework. On a much earlier post in this thread, you recommended to ground of boards to the case. But what if the case is not made of a conductive material? What do I need to ground exactly. I never worried in the past, but nothing I ever built run with more than 35V rails.

In addition, I originally intended to use wood for the case like in the previous amps I built (no HV) as it is much easier and pleasant for me to build. Reading stories of sparks flying by a few builder, I am having second thoughts. Would you advise against wood? Or a plastic case?

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Wood or plastic are both insulators so nothing wrong with using either as chassis material. I tend to use metal due to the shielding properties though.

I never use ground loop breakers on any of my gear.

Made some progress on one of my HV's. Here is proof that one will fit in a 2U 400mm chassis... grin.gif

1201651.jpg

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