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manaox2
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I wonder if someone can help me. I have a NC1 AT&T S4 rooted with safestrap installed. I cannot instal AOSP or >4.4.2 from what I understand and chose graviton. Issue is I cannot get wifi working as likely the module was too large to include into the base image. I have a working backup. How can I extract the working NC1 modules (/lib?) and create a modules.zip for use?

Alternatively, any safestrap builds that will work out of the box for me?

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I received the wireless charging back panel for the S5 last night and installed it without incident (so far).  Yes, it makes the phone marginally thicker and a little heavier.  To my hands (largish) it actually makes the phone more comfortable to hold.  I was also pleased to discover that you do not have to use the Samsung branded charger (unnecessarily expensive) and managed to buy a charger for both work and home for less than Sammy's single unit would have cost.  Basically, the $50 rebate I got on the phone nearly covered the entire upgrade.  No more fiddling with the battery door I will have allegedly maintained my water-tightness.

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Thanks to a recent Groupon, I now have a 2nd Nexus 4, so can avoid single point of failure. In the meantime I've done exactly what you'd expect.
 
post-545-0-02279600-1416712408_thumb.png


And then enabling LTE :)
1053634511.png
 
 
Interesting to compare different software on exact same hardware to see how a feel about it.
 
tapatalk crashes when trying to add attachment, hence EDIT...

Edited by Grahame
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Add GranitePhone to the list: http://www.granitephone.com 

"FRIENDLY INTERFACE. DEVELOPED FOR UNIQUE PEOPLE."

 

So far as I've been able to tell, you could make any android phone as secure as the granitephone by downloading a few apps. Other than that pic of an unattractive interface, they don't really publish any solid info on what's special about it anywhere. It's very pricey as well. It's weaker than a kickstarter page for a half baked idea. All this jargon filled vaporware can be yours for $830.

The actual black phone 2 has a security team that modified and patched the android OS lead by some big names like Phil Zimmerman (creator of PGP) and former Entrust Chief Technology Officer John Callas (the man behind much of the security in Mac OS X and iOS). Blackphone's chief architect is Mike Kershaw, (known in the security realm as the developer of the Kismet Wi-Fi auditing tool). The device receives security patches faster than even Google patches nexus devices typically.

The modified Android it uses called Silent OS supports multiple (up to four) "spaces": virtualized phones within the phone. It has very granular control of permissions allowing you to selectively punch through between spaces per app and controlling apps permissions for privacy, matching company security standards, and for several users.

Software is installed to create a virtual burner phone and encrypted secure private communications. Phone calls are encrypted peer-to-peer and end-to-end over the network, so the service doesn't hold a key to decrypt the contents. While it doesn't prevent legal wiretapping on a public switched network, it protects privacy from direct call monitoring at the source. Texting has a function called "burn notice." You can set a time limit for a message to be available to the person you sent it to, after which the key for the message expires and the text or image is deleted (texts are a link to a temporary message encrypted on secure server hosted on Amazon cloud). The apps use pinned certificates.

The smart WiFi manager prevents communication with rogue access points that poll cell phone devices for APs they are searching for in order to spoof them. It also creates a fingerprint of nearby cellular towers to control permissions on WiFi and Bluetooth instead of relying on GPS or Google's location services.

The OS has selective wiping of sensitive apps and data options, remotely or conditional.

It's obviously overkill for an average phone user, but it's the only phone in my opinion actually focused on security and privacy first.

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I just got a notification to update my OS to Nougat. I don't follow any of this stuff anymore, so anyone know if I should do it? Usually upgrades make things worse in my experience, but it's balanced by the fact that the damn update popup appears every now and then.


I don't think it should be as bad as the jump to marshmallow with its permission requests and storage changes that developers weren't prepared for. If you are on MM already, I'd go for it.

XDA developers forum for your phone would be a good place to check out how others are fairing if you're on the fence.
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