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Which Cooking Are You?


luvdunhill
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Really, just 2 degrees?  2 degrees can be a big deal with eggs, but I can't see it with beef, especially since the meat is cooked, even at that temp. On the very rare occasions I eat beef, I do 118.  I give the meat a light going over with the searz-all, before sealing the bag (some people do a brief simmer, but I don't like adding liquid, even small amounts, to meat being cooked sous vide), so there is little additional risk, and a prime sirloin done at 118 for 6 hours and then seared with a combination of a screaming hot carbon pan and a searz-all on full blast is just a thing of absolute beauty.  Last had one after my divorce finalized.  Probably won't have another any time real soon.

If it's not at least 1 inch thick, I don't recommend going beyond 4 hours, but a 1.5 inch thick sirloin benefits from the extra time, at least at the lower temp.  I'm sure that steak was delicious, I'll quit breaking your balls and explaining your business to you, now. :)

Edited by EdipisReks1
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I wasn't thinking about the fat, to be honest.  I can see that, but that's pretty picky!  I'm assuming she prefers that the fat melts into the meat a bit more?  This might make an interesting study, comparing beef fat to pectin.  Pectin's melting point dramatically changes the way a vegetable feels in the mouth:  it softens/dissolves at one temp, but at another temp, very close to that point, it turns to liquid and leaves the vegetable,   It's why it's important to just get beyond that temp, when cooking vegetables sous vide.  Otherwise you are poaching them.

Edited by EdipisReks1
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11 hours ago, EdipisReks1 said:

I wasn't thinking about the fat, to be honest.  I can see that, but that's pretty picky!  I'm assuming she prefers that the fat melts into the meat a bit more?  This might make an interesting study, comparing beef fat to pectin.  Pectin's melting point dramatically changes the way a vegetable feels in the mouth:  it softens/dissolves at one temp, but at another temp, very close to that point, it turns to liquid and leaves the vegetable,   It's why it's important to just get beyond that temp, when cooking vegetables sous vide.  Otherwise you are poaching them.

I think your way of thinking is correct. At this point I can usually taste a piece of beef and tell if she'll like it based on the way it feels and the flavor profile. Luckily for me she's was less picky about who she fell in love with ;)

I have always shared my sous vide made meals with her etc so I've never done a truly rare steak at 120 or so like you are proposing, 127 was as low as I've gone and she ate about 3 bites. I generally eat rare at dinners. Maybe I'll try that when she's out of town on a work trip.

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