Jump to content

Photography tips


hungrych
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'll take a stab at this one having owned a wedding/portrait studio for ten years. I'm not familiar with the Canon A520 specifically, but I'm guessing it's a point & shoot camera. In general, the more control you have over your camera (shutter/aperature), the better. Point and shoots usually set the exposure for you, often with less than great results. Several things about taking photos of headphones - turn off your on-camera flash, that will almost always result in poor looking photos. Use either diffused daylight from a window (direct sun is not good), or a lamp of some sorts. You want the light to sweep across the headphone to create hightlights and shadows in your photo (flat light is less appealling). Digital cameras don't like too much contrast (difference between the highlights and shadows) so try filling in some of the shadow with a white piece of cardboard if the shadow areas look black. If you use an incandescent lamp or flourescent for your light source, make sure to set your camera's white balance to match. Each of these sources have a different color temperature from daylight. The background of your photo should be simple and contrasting from the subject. This way, the viewers eye's will fall on the subject and not be distracted by the background. Remember that the higher ISO (film speed) that you set, the more grainy your photo will appear. In general, use the fastest ISO possible with the light you have available. Take several photos from different angles and focal lengths. For hand-held shooting, try to stay at 1/40 of a second or more to avoid blurring. You can shoot at slower shutter speeds if you use a wider lens setting, zooming the camera all the way in will require a higher shutter speed. Hope this helps some.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll take a stab at this one having owned a wedding/portrait studio for ten years. I'm not familiar with the Canon A520 specifically, but I'm guessing it's a point & shoot camera. In general, the more control you have over your camera (shutter/aperature), the better. Point and shoots usually set the exposure for you, often with less than great results. Several things about taking photos of headphones - turn off your on-camera flash, that will almost always result in poor looking photos. Use either diffused daylight from a window (direct sun is not good), or a lamp of some sorts. You want the light to sweep across the headphone to create hightlights and shadows in your photo (flat light is less appealling). Digital cameras don't like too much contrast (difference between the highlights and shadows) so try filling in some of the shadow with a white piece of cardboard if the shadow areas look black. If you use an incandescent lamp or flourescent for your light source, make sure to set your camera's white balance to match. Each of these sources have a different color temperature from daylight. The background of your photo should be simple and contrasting from the subject. This way, the viewers eye's will fall on the subject and not be distracted by the background. Remember that the higher ISO (film speed) that you set, the more grainy your photo will appear. In general, use the fastest ISO possible with the light you have available. Take several photos from different angles and focal lengths. For hand-held shooting, try to stay at 1/40 of a second or more to avoid blurring. You can shoot at slower shutter speeds if you use a wider lens setting, zooming the camera all the way in will require a higher shutter speed. Hope this helps some.

Thanks! I guess I really need to read the camera manual to figure out the settings. I bought a point and shoot since it's supposed to be easier to use for somebody like me, who isn't an avid photographer or anything, but now I'm kind of getting into the whole thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The fun of photography is learning to control the camera to get the result you want. Ansel Adams envisioned the final photo in his head before ever taking the picture and had the skills to manipulate the camera, developing and printing to create what he wanted. I think that digital is even more fun than film, since the results are instant. Digital makes it a lot easier (and cheaper) to experiment with new ideas and shoot as much as you like. The basic principals of photography though have not changed with the advent of digital. The rules of exposure and composition remain the same.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...