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Crafting Thread -- Ask Questions About Casework and Whatnot Here ...


dsavitsk
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DRILL PRESS!!!

I need a drill press. I'd like to buy it local, not ebay or Amazon. Seems like shipping something like that would be too much. I wanted to get a Delta, but spotted a few others like Hitachi. I've heard good and bad about Craftsman, and generally good things about some at Harbor Freight. Still, I am undecided. Ideas?

What projects do you intend to do with the drillpress? The reason that I ask is that a small mill might make a better (or worse) choice.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...

Front Panel Express is having a promotion in which an old customer introduces a new customer and both get 20% off on the next order. Once the new customer's order is shipped, a discount code will be sent to the old customer. I do not believe that there is an expiration date on the code (needs confirmation.)

I'm going to be placing an order with FPE for the first time, so if anyone is doing panel work with FPE soon, PM me the customer reference code. If not, will some one still go request a reference code from FPE for me, so at least I can get the 20% off? unsure.png

Many thanks.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Always leave a small margin of tolerance when manually measuring. For example if a hole measures 40mm x 20mm, I’d CAD it at ~40.3mm x 20.3mm.

If you can find data sheets for component panel measurements, then I CAD them exactly to these measurements, and manually measure the actual component for a double check, don’t blindly go straight from the data sheets without checking. Make a dummy cardboard panel, cut the holes out with a scalpel and mount your components on this for a triple check, screws and all.

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Thanks for the advice! I'm usually rounding up to the nearest full millimeter so most of the time I'll be getting about 0.3-0.7mm worth of play. And now I'm starting to regret that I choose those fancy Neutrik RCA's that need those extra screw holes.

Regarding the layout - how hard should I fight for reducing the line signal wires? I have a JT attenuator that in theory could be mounted on the back panel with RCA's almost touching the inlets and total line signal path being under 70mm. Are low power (30VA) trannies noisy enough to cause any issues?

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The Neutrik RCA’s data sheet will have panel mount drawing measurements that already take into account fit tolerances. Unless you’re making a concession for something unexpected... I’ve used these measurements many times using Cam-Expert and FPE with no problems.

Try and mount the JT relay module/s on the back panel as close to the I/O’s as possible. Keep the relay driver board with 30VA transformers furtherest away from sensitive audio lines at the other side of the layout.

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I was thinking of putting the relay board on the back panel but then it occurred to me that I'm at most saving about 7cm of wire. Also I just fired up the Visual Analyzer and tried moving the relay board towards the working transformers. Oddly enough only at 150-200Hz grew a small 5dB hill that wasn't previously there. And that's with putting the relay board directly on the EI-Core tranny. I'm starting to think that EM radiation from AC devices is a bit overblown. Sure, doing something silly like routing signal wires under a tranny might get some noise but to me it seems that my creations have a whole lot more other bugs that need squishing before I start making Faraday cages.

In other news- next week I'll build an O2 to see what's the fuss about. Maybe even bring to some guys to do measurements and compare to my Dynalo and probably a two board B22. Most of the local electronics enthusiasts laughed their asses off when they saw the Holy Grail of headphone amplification.

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  • 3 weeks later...

just had the most horrible experience with Camexpert. Some how they decided that using an imperial tap for M3 is close enough. So, the screw got jammed when I tried to screw it in. It's partially my fault for not checking it before trying to screw the M3 screws in. I guess you really can't take anything for granted, even if the damn CAD file says clearly that they have to be M3. I decided to write them an email about it on Monday. Well, they have yet to reply me. I still remember how fast of a response I got when I was telling them I was placing an order. I decided to just go to a local machine shop. They are charging me $40 for the fix and re-sizing the holes. A little expensive consider that I had to drive 40min, but the owner of the shop was superb. I'll probably do all my future case works with him. I still can't understand how one can charge his customer $60 for twelve M3 holes and fail to check if M3 screws can actually go in before shipping them out. pure ridiculousness.

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Sorry to hear about you experience,

I’ve dealt with Cam-Expert for years and the one thing I will never do with them is hand them CAD files. They exclusively use FPE software, so they’ll take your CAD file and maually input the data back into FPE which is open to all sorts of interpetations.

I can’t tell you the amount of mistakes and fuck-ups I’ve had but it was considerable, my EHHA top plate was wrong twice, at least 3 out of 7 panels for my DCB1 were screwed just off the top of my head. Cam-Expert always replaced free of charge and shipped back out to Australia.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I dunno if the broken tap issue ever got solved, it was a while ago, but one way I might approach this is to try to cut a slot in the top of the tap with a diamond disk or other abrasive disk in a Dremel. Then you've got something that will accept a screwdriver. Abrasives are among the few things that will mark a tap. This is something that I've had to do to extract screws, sometimes old rusted crosshead ones in cars offer no purchase for a driver.

The penalty would be a slot cut into the workpiece, but it might be better than losing the workpiece or being forced to drill and tap another hole elsewhere. If the tapped hole is to hold down a coverplate, the groove might never be seen.

w

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In what capacity will it be used? Interior, exterior? How much wear and tear will it see?

If it is a hardwood veneer, I personally would be opposed to paint or stain. Polyurethanes/marine varnishes offer the most durability, but Tung Oil and Lacquer will give more depth and beauty.

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Marc, I received it as a flatpack from Dave Dlugos in Canada as I have no means of making the precise rounded cuts necessary for the side baffles or the angled front baffle. I will be able to look at everything on Wednesday and let you know. I was hoping to go in with a plan so I am not wasting a day but I guess being patient will yield better results. I'll take pictures then. 

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Well you definitely don't want to pre-finish everything before assembly! Unless you can mask off the edges and datos that will be glued. The clear coat will impede the glue.

My suggestion is to build the speakers, then use a foam brush to apply Tung oil. Mask off any ares you don't want finished (speaker flanges, binding posts, etc...). Apply the Tung oil lightly. You don't want any drips. Let each coat dry for 24 hours. Buff all areas lightly, by hand, with 0000 steel wool, between each coat. (Lowes, Home Depot, etc...). Towel off steel wool residue, apply the next coat, repeat 4 - 5 times. You will have a gorgeous finish.

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The Tung oil will not need an additional clear coat. It will be durable and beautiful.

If after a few years it starts looking dingy, simply apply an additional coat or two, right over the existing finish. It's that easy to maintain.

Do not use a sander. Just rub down the piece with the 0000 Steel wool. Not 0, not 00, and not 000, but 0000 steel wool. The others are too abrasive.

As to brands, this is what I use...

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2007259/9891/arm-r-seal-top-coat-satin-quart.aspx

It's basically Tung oil, but with urethane modifiers to strengthen the finish.

I order it from Woodcraft.

However, any Tung oil will work fine. I think Lowes sells Formby's Tung oil, and it's good.

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