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Knuckledragger

The Official Head-Case Photography Thread.

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After blathering in several different threads about photography, and blindly looking around for an already extant thread, I'm making this one. The purpose here is for me continue to natter on about my mad obsession with light painting, and maybe even get a response or two. I've just posted about my issues with cross processing and slide film development, as well as discussing lenses in the recently bought thread.

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After a frustrating experience with Ritz Camera, I just got off the phone with Iris Photo. They do cross processing of film, but only slide film as print film. I probably should have known this, but slide-as-film is how 99% of cross processing is done. Film-as-slide processing is "reverse cross processing" and almost never done, as it's bad for the chemistry of the developer, and generally wrecks the film. :palm:

As a bonus, Irish has an overstock of Fuji Velvia 50, and is selling it for $6.50 a roll. :dance: Of all the film stocks to have an excess of... wow. I'm leaving shortly to buy them out get a few more rolls for my MV trip. Apparently, Velvia stands up very well to cross processing.

Canon EF 17-40mm F/4L + Velvia 50 + cross processing = psychedelic landscapes. ;D

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I scored 3 rolls of Velvia 50 from Iris, at $6.50 ea (teh cheep) as well as a roll of Fuji Sensia 200. It turns out Velvia 50, besides being the best film stock in the world, also stands up to the rigors of cross processing quite well, and at half price, it becomes a comparative bargian (the Sensia was $10.50.)

I'm going to expose the Sensia using my Vivitar Ultra Wide Slim pocket camera. It's a step above "trashcams" but not by much, it has a fixed shutter speed, aperture, and (duh) focal length. It's 1/125 and F/11 (which is Sunny 16 shifted one position) and a 22mm lens, which is really wide for this class of camera. The Ultra Wide Slim is famed for its massive vignetting, and fun effects when pointed straight into the sun. Shooting slide film with it is a benighted idea at best. Cross prossing said film is an even more demented undertaking. I can't wait to try it.

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I scored 3 rolls of Velvia 50 from Iris, at $6.50 ea

Score!! $6.50 per roll is cheap. Post up the results. I dig really sick irradiated lomography.

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Cool! I was thinking of starting one myself here but wasn't sure so I didn't.

If you would like to process slide as film why don't you start doing it yourself? Chems are still available and not that expensive.

That is cheap for the velvia 50, wow. And it's a gorgeous film. Do post up the results, would love to see that. Good luck with the shooting!

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Knuckles, if you're serious here are the DIY instructions:

Kodak Flexicolor Process

I use a CPP2 to DIY B&W and E-6. And now you have my creative juices gurgling so I might have to abuse some C-41, I've got a bunch of expired tungsten E-6 willing and waiting.

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I'm mobile, stealing wahrless internets from some unsuspecting donor, so no time for a proper reply.

The $3 price for the Vivitar per unit in lots of 100, I am afraid. I got one of eBay for $12. I ran a roll of junky ISO200 print film though it. Results are amusing, I'll post some examples later.

Re: developing film myself. That is definitely in the future. I am currently in the process of renovating my house. I'm going to turn the downstairs bathroom in my house into a darkroom. Initially, I'm going to teach myself to develop black & white film, but I plan to work up to color film, and then cross processing. That will all take time of course...

Now, the real subject I meant to post about: I just got back the slides and scans from the first roll of Velvia 50 I ever shot. It is officially the best film stock ever. I have never seen blues or greens the beautiful before. I'll post results when I'm at home.

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Velvia 50 lives up to its reputation. This is the first frame off the roll. Jernegan Pond, which sits at the edge of my property on Martha's Vineyard, is one of my most covered subjects. I've shot it with a Sony Mavica (blech), Canon PowerShot S60 (regular and HDR), EOS 30D (ditto), several different film stocks, and a menagerie of lenses. This might not be the best picture I've ever taken of it, but it's effin' close. I suspect if there's a better shot, it's somewhere on this roll of Velvia 50. I haven't uploaded any other pix from the Velvia roll yet. I'll try to get to that in the next couple days.

I've uploaded some shots taken with the Vivitar Ultra Wide & Slim as well:

Film was some generic ISO 200 store brand. There's a couple more shots on my Flickr page.

Those are nice shots you posted, Cankin. That last one illustrates a fun aspect of the camera: the wacky flare it produces when you shoot it into the sun. Do you remember what film stock you used?

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I was using some Walmart brand film(ISO400), another fun aspect of this camera is that, you don't have to compose seriously, just shoot :)

I can't wait to try this tomorrow, film is fun!

2741014702_5d36f637bc_m.jpg

BTW, what did you scan those pictures with?? I'm thinking of getting a cheap flatbed scanner which can scan film as well, but I'm not sure how good/bad they are.

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I have never seen blues or greens that beautiful before. I'll post results when I'm at home.

Well it's to be expected, it came in a green and blue box. If you want great yellows and reds you need to get the stuff in the yellow and red box.

KKPKR36U.jpg

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I was using some Walmart brand film(ISO400),

BTW, what did you scan those pictures with?? I'm thinking of getting a cheap flatbed scanner which can scan film as well, but I'm not sure how good/bad they are.

I had Iris Photo scan the slides. They offer three resolutions of scanning, base (300dpi @ 4x6") which is $8 for a CD, or a free upload to their server for members, and uh, two higher rez. ones, which are $15 and $20 respectively. I dun remember the size because I haven't had my coffee yet. I opted for the middle one on this first roll of Velvia. After looking at the slides, they didn't get the contrast as right as I would have liked, but the results are still quite good. I to eventually plan on buying a slide scanner.

Well it's to be expected, it came in a green and blue box. If you want great yellows and reds you need to get the stuff in the yellow and red box.

I cannot argue with this, your logic is impeccable. :rofl:

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Velvia 50 is very high contrast and has a very narrow dynamic range. I will be applying these lessons to the next roll I shoot.

If you haven't done so already, you might want to push the ASA dial up a notch, to 64, in lieu of 50, to get a bit more color saturation.

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Nice shots. The blue is indeed awesomely blue wow! Long time ago when I worked with slide film. Makes me wanna go out and do it again, also the cross processing.

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Oh, to clarify what I said about landscapes, I love looking at them, I just suck at taking them. Damn my uncreative mind!

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Not a great pic, still learning how to use a DSLR, but I wanted to capture the moment. ;)

[ig]http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g156/Asrale/Colorado/sunset_0818.jpg

Colorado sunset: Looks like you're a few minutes late. IIRC this time of year the afternoon storm clouds are rolling in so the sunsets should be phenomenal.

Welcome to HC....

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