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The Official Head-Case Photography Thread.


Knuckledragger
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Random pics taken at and near the Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, CA, on Friday last week. 1, 5, & 6 were taken with my Tamron 17-50, the others were taken with my Sigma 50-150 (a fantastic lens btw).

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(click any for larger)

Great pics of one of my favorite places, Asr.

This is way off topic (my snapshot below doesn't belong with all of the wonderful photography in this thread), but I got to pilot the fine aquarium tour vessel, the Derek M. Baylis, seen lower-center in your post, for about 45 minutes the last time I was there; I definitely recommend the day sail tour if you go back and you've got time and want to moar awesome bay shots.

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Random pics taken at and near the Monterey Bay Aquarium in Monterey, CA, on Friday last week. 1, 5, & 6 were taken with my Tamron 17-50, the others were taken with my Sigma 50-150 (a fantastic lens btw).

Are there any tricks to shooting through glass? I haven't done that much reading, but I remember when I was at Comicon shooting through glass display cases was problematic at times. Flash w/ diffuser? Is there any way around getting rid of other light sources (ie ones coming in from behind you)?

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Are there any tricks to shooting through glass? I haven't done that much reading, but I remember when I was at Comicon shooting through glass display cases was problematic at times. Flash w/ diffuser? Is there any way around getting rid of other light sources (ie ones coming in from behind you)?

I'm not adept with any specific techniques or tools when it comes to shooting through glass - I usually just try to shift my position to get reflections or light out of the way, and of course the focus point should be set to your intended target. Generally speaking, fewer lights/reflections will show up the closer you are to the subject. Also, it helps to point the camera away from any light sources, if at all possible.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Pics from an intra-state trip to Mesa Verde and the Four Corners last weekend (8/21-23). I wish I could say that at least one of these was straight from the camera, but alas, all were tweaked with Photoshop.

Sequence numbers from left-right, up-down:

1 - San Juan mtns between Sawpit & Telluride, CO (1/250 @ f/10, 85mm)

2 - On the way into Telluride - town not much further away from grove of distant trees (1/125 @ f/8, 50mm)

3 - Inside Mesa Verde National Park (1/125 @ f/10, 50mm)

4 - "Dead" tree grove inside MVNP, 1 of 3 (1/160 @ f/8, 17mm)

5 - "Dead" tree grove inside MVNP, 2 of 3 (1/500 @ f/4, 48mm)

6 - "Dead" tree grove inside MVNP, 3 of 3 (1/500 @ f/4, 48mm)

7 - Cliff Palace cliff dwelling on Chapin Mesa inside MVNP (1/320 @ f/4, 50mm)

8 - Butte near the Four Corners, 1 of 2 (1/30 @ f/11, 150mm)

9 - Butte near the Four Corners, 2 of 2 (1/30 @ f/13, 50mm)

10 - Unknown mesa near the Four Corners (1/60 @ f/9, 150mm)

11 - San Juan summit pass between Silverton-Ouray, 1 of 4 (1/30 @ f/20, 31mm)

12 - San Juan summit pass between Silverton-Ouray, 2 of 4 (1/30 @ f/18, 17mm)

13* - San Juan summit pass between Silverton-Ouray, 3 of 4 (1/160 @ f/8, 98mm)

14 - San Juan summit pass between Silverton-Ouray, 4 of 4 (1/160 @ f/14, 50mm)

15* - Blue Mesa Reservoir (past Black Canyon, before Gunnison) (1/160 @ f/8, 34mm)

* converted to grayscale due to incorrect exposure (overexposure on 13, underexposure on 15)

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ASR, there's no shame at all in tweaking your photos in photoshop (aka post-processing), in fact is a vital part of making your best possible photos, IMO. Many of history's great photographers have done a great degree of their best work in the darkroom (analog or digital).

Of the shots you posted, #8 is the best for me, with really nice color and sharpness.

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ASR, there's no shame at all in tweaking your photos in photoshop (aka post-processing), in fact is a vital part of making your best possible photos, IMO. Many of history's great photographers have done a great degree of their best work in the darkroom (analog or digital).

Of the shots you posted, #8 is the best for me, with really nice color and sharpness.

Indeed, I'm beginning to realize that in-camera pics are just a starting point and almost any pic can be made to look better or even outstanding later (well, you still can't polish a turd of a pic though). ;) Photoshop's Color Variations tool is awesomely handy! Makes it easy to add color and resolution, as you noted on #8.

And more pics from both yesterday and today:

Sad goose @ lake inside Keystone Resort

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Above-seen goose trying to hide from me!

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Red, white, & blue flags @ Keystone Resort

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Colorado State Capitol Building - City Civic Center Park (Downtown Denver)

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People-watching @ the 2009 A Taste of Colorado festival (Civic Park, Denver)

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