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grawk

What are you reading now?

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First time chiming in here.

Been reading the Legend of the Condor Heroes (English translated version) by Jin Yong (pen name of Louis Cha who departed recently) Book I. A classic novel of martial arts intrigue. Fast paced and manages to hold my attention, which tends to get very short most of the time :p  

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Is Anna Holmwood the translator? I've been getting around to starting the series, but the books are expensive import editions.

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A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson – a great science book for non-scientists:

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It sat on my bookshelf for years – it's a long book, but it's easy to read because Bryson is a great storyteller.

Highly recommended.

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Hillbilly Elegy. I have a million issues with what it doesn't explore, but after just returning from a family visit in rural Ohio, and the direction things seem to be going in those specific townships/villages, I can't deny much of what it does.  In the end it's a memoir and memoirs have inherent limitations.

Next up is supposedly the one - Nancy Isenberg's White Trash.

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Harry_Potter_and_the_Goblet_of_Fire.jpg 220px-Harry_Potter_and_the_Order_of_the_ Harry_Potter_and_the_Half-Blood_Prince.j Harry_Potter_and_the_Deathly_Hallows.jpg

I finished the series over the holiday. What a fun ride that was!

Rowling created a magnificent world, and I had a wonderful time in the 2-months I spent there while reading the books.

I have a lot of respect for her in getting people exited to read books again.

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La Belle Sauvage by Philip Pullman – follow-up prequel to the Golden Compass trilogy (His Dark Materials) in the new trilogy, The Book of Dust

One of the best novels I've read in the last few years – can't wait for the next book to come out.

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The 2nd book in the trilogy, The Secret Commonwealth, is due this October:

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Edited by HiWire
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On 4/13/2019 at 10:48 PM, Dusty Chalk said:

Finally finished Blood of the Gods by David Mealing (Book 2 of The Ascension Cycle).  Can't wait for book 3.

Resuming The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (Book 2 of The Kingkiller Chronicles).

Long since finished Wise Man’s Fear; read everything by “Forthright”; now reading the Mistborn series, on book 3.

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The Killer Angels - Michael Shaara

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Wow. This was amazing. I'm not normally a fan of historical fiction but this is a hell of a book. The praise it gets and the reverence with which it is treated are totally deserved.

If you have ever had any interest in military history, the civil war, or historical fiction this is an absolute must read.

Edited by TMoney
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Thanks TMoney! I do like historical fiction. I've been looking for a new book. This seems to fit. 

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“Why We Sleep” by Matthew Walker.

One of the most profound and illuminating books I can remember reading in recent years. (It’s not a rhetorical question either, he is one of the world’s most eminent researchers in neuro-imaging.)

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3 hours ago, Hopstretch said:

“Why We Sleep” by Matthew Walker.

One of the most profound and illuminating books I can remember reading in recent years. (It’s not a rhetorical question either, he is one of the world’s most eminent researchers in neuro-imaging.)

I am reading it as well, and have recommended it to others. Some real good info for those of us who don't sleep nearly as well as we should. There is a lot to learn that isn't intuitive.

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21 hours ago, Hopstretch said:

“Why We Sleep” by Matthew Walker.

One of the most profound and illuminating books I can remember reading in recent years. (It’s not a rhetorical question either, he is one of the world’s most eminent researchers in neuro-imaging.)

And now I am reading it, too.  I am definitely this book's target market. A lot is reminiscent of things I knew and thought (my theory has always been that dreams are the brain "freewheeling" -- I.E. unthrottled, which is very similar to how he describes it in the Joe Rogan interview; alcohol and most other drugs including sleeping pills are bad for sleep...), so I will read and learn.

 

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I heard that podcast awhile ago. It eliminated my wiggle room on alcohol and drugs and the effect on sleep. I used to think these things were just loose theories. 

Apparently, I'm an imbecile also thinking melatonin has been helping me get to sleep.

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City of Thieves by David Benioff (Game of Thrones showrunner) – the adventure of two young men set in the siege of Leningrad, this book has a bit of everything – action, history, literature, the absurdity of war, but most importantly, humor

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Edited by HiWire

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Just got to the part about day larks and night owls, and how circadian rhythms are hereditary but not inherited and that definitely rings true.  Also explains why moving my schedule back to early is a constant struggle.  

I should go to bed.

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The Plot Against America - Philip Roth

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What if Charles Lindbergh defeated FDR in the presidential election of 1940 and decided to form a non-aggression pact with Hitler's Germany? The effect of that historical counter-factual on the Jewish community of Newark, NJ is the center that this book revolves around.

It is about to become an HBO mini-series, so I figured I'd get out ahead of the curve.This was my first Philip Roth book. I enjoyed it. 

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