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i'm on a roll... the kgsshv


kevin gilmore
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That's very nice PICaudio you went to a lot of trouble on those.

I agree that using the remote shaft method is not as straightforward as it might seem.  I thought it would be good practice to keep the inputs and the mains switch at the back so did this with my Compact KGSShv. 

I originally used 6mm aluminium tube for the shafts and made nylon bushes for the front panel.  To get a nice feel to the operation this has to be made well with shafts lining up accurately etc.

paradoxper demanded a different layout with big central attenuator so had to abandon this principle.    It is as much work to do the wiring as it is to make the remote operators work well.  I have not found any increase in noise by

wiring up to the front and the benefit for me is that the feel of a pot/attenuator mounted directly to a thick front panel is better.

 

I did find an extension kit on the internet which had brass connectors and a brass front panel bush. The rod was 6mm solid ally.  

http://www.vt4c.com/shop/program/main.php?cat_id=35&group_id=2

 

EXT- KIT- 26 and 30

 

This is how my original build looked.  i still have those input pcbs lying around if anyone wants one

 

 

EFA6JQ4.jpg

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I'm looking for some help and extra pair of eyes on wiring a power entry module, push button, and transformer.

 

Context:

- Mains is 230v

- The power module is 115-230v switchable. It doesn't change the voltage, but I believe if wired correctly to the transformer (with 115v dual primaries) it can switch between parallel and series

- I plan to leave the power module switched ON on the back, then use the front push button to switch the amp ON and OFF

 

This is my current wiring diagram:

- I'm not sure if I'm wiring things in 115v series correctly

- Not sure how to wire the LED push button light so that when the button is ON, the LED is ON. I understand there's a resistor between there somewhere

 

 

16614054316_524f5535d4_o.png

References:

- Push button switch http://www.nkkswitches.com/pdf/cwscilluminated.pdf

- Power entry module http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/1511815.pdf

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I am sourcing the power transformer for the +/- 15V regulator for KGSSHV. Can I use a dual secondary transformer configured as a center-tapped transformer by joining one wire each from the two secondaries to form the center tap?

 

Anyone sees concerns of doing so? Or better yet, anyone has a Mouser part number that you recommend for this part? 

 

Thanks! 

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I just realised the transformer I have isn't 115-0-115-0, but rather 115-0-115. Can 115/230 switching still be done with the IEC module? In series, lugs 3 and 4 are inactive. In parallel, all four lugs are active. I'm not sure how to connect two 115 lines sharing a single 0.

 

Guessing... 230v: Connect one 115v to P and the other 115v to N. For 115v: Connect one 115v to P, and 0v to N.

 

 

16675313346_03ae995097_o.jpg

 

There should be one wire connecting both 0V and another one connecting both 115V terminals on the transformer.  Since you have a double pole switch, both those wires can come from the switch. 

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It can be wired as both 117V and 230V but why would you order a transformer like that.  You need a switch to wire them either in series or parallel but no simple solution springs to mind. 

 

I am sourcing the power transformer for the +/- 15V regulator for KGSSHV. Can I use a dual secondary transformer configured as a center-tapped transformer by joining one wire each from the two secondaries to form the center tap?

 

Anyone sees concerns of doing so? Or better yet, anyone has a Mouser part number that you recommend for this part? 

 

Thanks! 

 

Nothing wrong with doing this but watch the phase.  I had to do this on the KGDT's that I'm working on and used this transformer:

 

553-FS36-350

 

with these custom PCB's:

 

8eMxj9vh.jpg

 

It was the neatest way of doing it. I have some spare PCB's listed on my site if anybody needs one. 

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Thanks Birgir!

 

To honor the overkill spirit, do you see concerns (or benefit) in using a separate, perhaps more elaborated regulator for the +/- 15V rails (bypassing the built in one on the PSU board)?  I assume I will need to tie the ground of both PSUs together to make sure they are on the same potential.

 

Just a thought. 

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It can be wired as both 117V and 230V but why would you order a transformer like that. You need a switch to wire them either in series or parallel but no simple solution springs to mind.

Nothing wrong with doing this but watch the phase. I had to do this on the KGDT's that I'm working on and used this transformer:

553-FS36-350

with these custom PCB's:

8eMxj9vh.jpg

It was the neatest way of doing it. I have some spare PCB's listed on my site if anybody needs one.

MOTMOTMOTMOTMOTMOT

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