Jump to content

The ultimate DIY? A Stax SRM-T2!


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 4.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Finished...   Back plates before I mounted them...

I finally got the last plate machined.  I had to replace the spindle on my CNC and also made a mistake on the CAD so had to redo this plate, but it's looking great now.  

Been busy at work, but managed to pull a new version of the T2 amp board together. I've added separate modules for the active batteries, balance servo, pre-CCS feeding the output CCS and the opto

Posted Images

If bigir finds me another T2 floating around for sale from a reputable dealer/person

i would buy it just to add it to the collection of other things.

I can do a better job 25 years later. But justin class chassis's are a whole bunch

of work. At least i'm very now well familiar with the 3D milling machines and the

software, so i can make a chassis with all sorts of pretty holes pretty easily And

even go for completely custom one piece heatsinks. Then ship the stuff out

for anodizing. Should cost about $1k for the chassis. Assuming the labor is free.

The arlon circuit board makes no difference as the lower capacitance is

definitely not necessary, and it probably would have to be much thicker to hold

off the 1kv floating around.

This is pretty close now after about 18 hours of work.

http://gilmore.chem.northwestern.edu/staxt2rev0.bmp

at least all the obvious errors are gone, and the ground plane

has about 95% coverage once i add it.

Edited by kevin gilmore
Link to post
Share on other sites

1k-2k$ for the chassis isn't a bad deal but we simply have to make it in that gun metal gray. :cool:

If bigir finds me another T2 floating around for sale from a reputable dealer/person

i would buy it just to add it to the collection of other things.

I will continue to search. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

proposed power supply for high voltages

http://gilmore.chem.northwestern.edu/staxt2multips.jpg

There will be at least 5 of them. +500, +250, -250,-500, -560

might be overkill for the bias.

Way better than 1% regulation. Not dual tracking, that is a lot more work.

and probably unnecessary due to the servo's already in the thing.

Could do them as shunt regulated supplies, they would then dissipate a bunch

more heat.

Link to post
Share on other sites
you have a shorted LED all the way on the top left

And its mirror cousin. Fixed those two... thanks..

the npn on the power schematic is actually a 2sc3340 and

the reference will be a ref102 because its less than half the price for

the same thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm going to end up somewhere next year with lots of sand and nothing to do. This will definitely be on my list of time killers.

Amazing you keep stat equiptment in places like this:

sandstorm.jpg

That was BFE West of Baghdad

5.jpg

This is BFE Kandahar (compliments of my brother with MARCOM)

Someone in Israel asked me how to keep dust off the stats - I wouldn't have the first clue, as I understand it to be more like talcum.

Link to post
Share on other sites

power supply coming along.

http://gilmore.chem.northwestern.edu/staxt2rev0power-2.bmp

Need +/-12 and high voltage delay circuit.

have the one of the supplies on the bench for testing, works great.

Initial quote for the transformers is 3.7 OD, 1.8 High. Plenty of room

in the box for 3 of them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Things are coming along, current board has layout for standard (i.e. cheap)

and the teflon sockets, i'm thinking of going with the teflon sockets only.

Any opinions on this...

Definitely going to be less than $2000 in parts not including chassis.

even with the teflon sockets and the SumR transformers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Things are coming along, current board has layout for standard (i.e. cheap)

and the teflon sockets, i'm thinking of going with the teflon sockets only.

Any opinions on this...

Not that I could ever build one...... but IMHO considering cheap sockets seems a bit silly in a build of this magnitude :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

teflon sockets only it is. Actually looks a bit better this way.

Anyone that can build a dynahi can build this. If you stuff all the

parts in the right place and can do a really good job of soldering

it should be a snap.

http://gilmore.chem.northwestern.edu/staxt2connexonlyrev0-2.bmp

ground plane removed for picture otherwise it wipes everything away,

components that don't look like they have a lead connected are connected

to ground

http://gilmore.chem.northwestern.edu/staxt2rev0power-6.bmp

i even have a bill of materials. (first time ever)

so i have a clue how much its gonna cost, and how many more parts to buy.

231 semiconductors makes this the most complicated headphone amp ever.

Edited by kevin gilmore
Link to post
Share on other sites
Question: How much heatsinking will this need in comparison to the BH?

mostly due to layout. BHSE has 2 heatsinks 12 inches long.

plus heatsinks inside the power supply.

T2 amplifier has 2 heatsinks same height 17 inches long.

T2 power supply has 2 heatsinks same height 17 inches long.

(it really does not need this much, but it will look better when

sitting under the amplifier.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...