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n_maher

Part Sourcing Assistance/Advice Thread

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I was interested in the copper bar used to hold the silicon devices to the heat sink.  Pretty neat idea I had not seen before.  Of course, it requires a board layout that leaves room for that bar to avoid conflict with resistors, etc.  Also requires that all devices under the bar are the same thickness which may not be the case when mixing different devices to the same heatsink.  I does have the advantage of drawing heat away from both sides of the device.  And no need for peek screws!    

I wonder if devices are even engineered to take compression like this, vs just being held down by the hole mounting built into the device?  

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Edited by Blueman2

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54 minutes ago, Blueman2 said:

I was interested in the copper bar used to hold the silicon devices to the heat sink.  Pretty neat idea I had not seen before.  Of course, it requires a board layout that leaves room for that bar to avoid conflict with resistors, etc.  Also requires that all devices under the bar are the same thickness which may not be the case when mixing different devices to the same heatsink.  I does have the advantage of drawing heat away from both sides of the device.  And no need for peek screws!    

I have seen the same used on discrete power amps with a thick and "spongy" thermal pad on the bar to even out the differences in thickness. Then it was possible to clamp e.g. both Sanken MT200 power transistors and TO-220 VAS transistors with the same bar.

54 minutes ago, Blueman2 said:

I wonder if devices are even engineered to take compression like this, vs just being held down by the hole mounting built into the device?  

I would think that's fine. It also puts the clamping force directly on the body of the device and not on the flange, so there should be less risk of having devices that aren't completely flat against the heat sink (which would lead to thermal instability).

Edited by UFN
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