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What are you EATING right now?


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7 hours ago, Torpedo said:

I guess that should be "bacon garlioil" :D I don't know how you name alioli (allioli in Catalan, also ajoaceite in Spanish).

Well, I know what garlic aioli is, as I’ve grown quite fond of it lately.  I buy those rotisserie chickens from Wegmans and used to eat from them with hot sauce, but recently have been craving something with more garlic, so I tried that.  Quite good, but wanted even more garlic, so I mixed it with garlic paste.  I also looked up what an aioli was, and the question is, is the bacon actually part of the suspension?  How does that work?

Also, I’m going to start calling it garlioili from now on.:D

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So you call it aioli instead of alioli? Funny :D I thought it was a typo. The word comes from all (ajo, garlic) and oli (aceite, oil) in the Catalan speaking side of Spain.

The authentic is made of garlic, virgin olive oil and a tiny bit of salt. No eggs required, but you may use one if the result using just oil and garlic is too strong, so it comes out as a heavy garlic scented mayonnaise. It has to be hand made in a mortar, with a lot of patience and adding the oil very slowly, a couple of drops at a time. You first smash 3 or 4 fresh garlic cloves until they become a paste that could be spread on a toast, then you go adding the oil very slowly. If you try to speed it up it will "cut" (I don't know and can't find the word in English) and the sauce will be spoilt forming unmixable bubbles. There are ways to recover it, but it's not easy. That's the way I used to make it, not anymore for it's too strong for our aging stomachs. Once it's "locked" you may add a few drops of Tabasco or any other spicy sauce you wish. We don't do that, some people add just a few drops of lemon juice. I guess you can add bacon grease or trying to make the whole thing with liquid bacon grease, although probably it will become solid like butter once done.

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Everything I know about aioli, I learned from this page.  So I apologize for any inaccuracies and welcome corrections.  The page corroborates what you said, but that has not been my experience with store bought aioli.  Just garlic, oil, and a tiny bit of salt is exactly what I was looking for.

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2 hours ago, Torpedo said:

So you call it aioli instead of alioli? Funny :D I thought it was a typo. The word comes from all (ajo, garlic) and oli (aceite, oil) in the Catalan speaking side of Spain.

The authentic is made of garlic, virgin olive oil and a tiny bit of salt. No eggs required, but you may use one if the result using just oil and garlic is too strong, so it comes out as a heavy garlic scented mayonnaise. It has to be hand made in a mortar, with a lot of patience and adding the oil very slowly, a couple of drops at a time. You first smash 3 or 4 fresh garlic cloves until they become a paste that could be spread on a toast, then you go adding the oil very slowly. If you try to speed it up it will "cut" (I don't know and can't find the word in English) and the sauce will be spoilt forming unmixable bubbles. There are ways to recover it, but it's not easy. That's the way I used to make it, not anymore for it's too strong for our aging stomachs. Once it's "locked" you may add a few drops of Tabasco or any other spicy sauce you wish. We don't do that, some people add just a few drops of lemon juice. I guess you can add bacon grease or trying to make the whole thing with liquid bacon grease, although probably it will become solid like butter once done.

Thanks for the tutorial Antonio. 

I'll give it a try.

What I've heard to describe a sauce that has separated is "broken" as in " the sauce has broken" ?

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