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Death By Carbs - Bread and Dough Making

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Scones to start the week off right - chocolate coconut chocolate chip.

 

 

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Sorry, Brent, USPS says I can't ship them. 

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And I finally made some cast-iron-skillet cornbread.  It at least looks good, actual taste testing to commence shortly with the white bean chicken chili that Maura made.

 

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I love corn bread, I'm going to have to try out that recipe.

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54 minutes ago, n_maher said:

It's definitely the best corn bread I've ever made.  I'm very much looking forward to more later tonight.

Here's the recipe used - http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alexandra-guarnaschelli/cast-iron-skillet-corn-bread-recipe-2012669

That's very similar to my recipe. Try adding a chopped jalapeno to the batter.

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Interesting

 

 

https://returntonow.net/2018/09/04/were-not-gluten-intolerant-were-glyphosate-intolerant/

 

We’re Not Gluten Intolerant, We’re Glyphosate Intolerant

SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 AT 8:40 PM



 

Study blames Roundup herbicide for gluten intolerance and celiac disease epidemic

Gluten-or-GlyphosateIntolerant--300x169.




 

“Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it,” researchers wrote in a meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies.

“Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic,” they add.

The study, published in the journal Interdisciplinary Toxicology in 2013, was completely ignored by the media except for Mother Earth News and The Healthy Home Economist.

Now that glyphosate is getting the attention it deserves, being named as the culprit in a $280 million cancer lawsuit and labeled as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization and the state of California, it may be time to look at the chemical’s role in a related disease:

The symptoms of so-called “gluten intolerance” and celiac disease in are shockingly similar to the symptoms in lab animals exposed to glyphosate, argue the study’s authors Anthony Samsel, an independent scientist who’s served as a consultant to the EPA on arsenic pollution and to the U.S. Coast Guard on chemical hazard response, and Stephanie Seneff, a senior research scientist at MIT.

 

They point to a recent study on how glyphosate effects the digestive systems of fish. It decreased digestive enzymes and bacteria, disrupted mucosal folds, destroyed microvilli structure in the intestinal wall, and increased secretion of mucin.

“These features are highly reminiscent of celiac disease,” Samsel and Seneff write.

Additionally, the number of people diagnosed with gluten intolerance and celiac disease has risen in tandem with the increased use of glyphosate in agriculture, especially with the recent practice of drenching grains in the herbicide right before harvest, which started in the 1980s and became routine in the 1990s:

22-300x170.jpg

While some suggest the recent surge in celiac disease is due simply to better diagnostic tools (which as you can see above happened around 2000), a recent study suggests it’s more than that.

In 2009, researchers looked for gluten antibodies in frozen immune serum obtained between 1948 and 1954 for gluten antibodies, and compared them with samples from people today. They found a 4-fold increase in the incidence of celiac disease in the younger generation.

As further evidence the researchers make the following points:

“Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria.”

“Celiac disease is associated with the impairment of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes.”

“Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate’s strong ability to chelate these elements.”

“Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate’s known depletion of these amino acids.”

“Celiac disease patients also have a known increased risk for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure.”

“The incidence of non-Hodgkins lymphoma has increased rapidly in most Western countries over the last few decades. Statistics from the American Cancer Society show an 80% increase since the early 1970’s, when glyphosate was first introduced on the market.”

“Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate.”

Glyphosate residues in grain, sugar and other crops are increasing recently likely due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to harvest, the researchers say. The secretive, illegal practice has become routine among conventional farmers since the 1990s.

wheat-is-toxic-and-its-not-the-gluten_mi

Credit: Healthy Home Economist

Ironically, the practice increases yields by killing the crops. Just before the plants die, they release their seeds in order to propagate the species:

“It goes to seed as it dies. At its last gasp, it releases the seed,” Seneff told The Healthy Home Economist.

Moral of the story? We need to go glyphosate-free, not gluten-free. And that means going organic, especially when it comes to grains and animals who eat those grains. Well, you might need to go gluten-free too for a while, until you’ve healed your gut.

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Very interesting indeed.  I wonder how this relates to other parts of the world who might use different methods. 

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I know right? -- I do have some anecdotal experience with some people trying various ancient grains (kamut) and newly developed (non pesticide breading) grains not having gut issues when I share those vs other grains and flours.

 

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So if rye bread is all about the grain and sourdough bread is all about the yeast, why isn't there--or isn't there more--sourdough rye bread?

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Well there is - but maybe not what you think. 

Rye is a very low gluten grain - as such it is much easier to make a pan loaf, and make it really hearty with lots of grains and seeds. 

But with that being said, we make just about all our rye breads with natural leavening (or sourdough starter). Because the acidity that comes with the starter is great for working with the rye - it wants an acidic environment. It is really hard to get a artisan style rye loaf to have any sort of open crumb if the rye content is over 50% of the flour, it just falls under it's own weight from the lack of gluten structure. 

And the rest is about marketing and perception. In 'merica, rye bread means mostly white bread with a touch of rye and a shite load of caraway. In old world, rye is used in so many ways that it is staggering the variety and flavors that you can get. 

Hope that helps a little. 

----------------------

 

 

On other bread fronts... Sonja and I are still making progress on our bakery.

Sonja completed her second test bake in a local commercial kitchen (with steam deck oven). She is working on all the paperwork and licenses to be able to sell locally. 

We have acquired - https://www.tafonibakehouse.com/ - nothing published yet.

Other progress at -- https://www.instagram.com/tafonibakehouse

All sorts of small steps - but should be selling soon.

 

IMG_20200124_094852.thumb.jpg.6736c753255d28f640ef25e55462b44f.jpg

IMG_20200124_103239.thumb.jpg.fa9e0ad94955b96bfbf11b6a5cd0962e.jpg

IMG_20200124_095831.thumb.jpg.4aa296dea5a6c0a1edb9fb4965b981a2.jpg

00000PORTRAIT_00000_BURST20200122091847424.thumb.jpg.3432f164432c8d3ae50b10553382dd34.jpg

 

First delivery of flour as a business: 

IMG_20200125_113615.thumb.jpg.92bcebe67679cc35aae53222c3cabfe8.jpg

 

Cheers

Mikey

 

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Good to hear about your progress even though the pics have me salivating wildly. 

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On 1/26/2020 at 6:43 PM, mikeymad said:

Well there is - but maybe not what you think. 

Rye is a very low gluten grain - as such it is much easier to make a pan loaf, and make it really hearty with lots of grains and seeds. 

But with that being said, we make just about all our rye breads with natural leavening (or sourdough starter). Because the acidity that comes with the starter is great for working with the rye - it wants an acidic environment. It is really hard to get a artisan style rye loaf to have any sort of open crumb if the rye content is over 50% of the flour, it just falls under it's own weight from the lack of gluten structure. 

And the rest is about marketing and perception. In 'merica, rye bread means mostly white bread with a touch of rye and a shite load of caraway. In old world, rye is used in so many ways that it is staggering the variety and flavors that you can get. 

Hope that helps a little. 

----------------------

 

 

On other bread fronts... Sonja and I are still making progress on our bakery.

Sonja completed her second test bake in a local commercial kitchen (with steam deck oven). She is working on all the paperwork and licenses to be able to sell locally. 

We have acquired - https://www.tafonibakehouse.com/ - nothing published yet.

Other progress at -- https://www.instagram.com/tafonibakehouse

All sorts of small steps - but should be selling soon.

 

IMG_20200124_094852.thumb.jpg.6736c753255d28f640ef25e55462b44f.jpg

IMG_20200124_103239.thumb.jpg.fa9e0ad94955b96bfbf11b6a5cd0962e.jpg

IMG_20200124_095831.thumb.jpg.4aa296dea5a6c0a1edb9fb4965b981a2.jpg

00000PORTRAIT_00000_BURST20200122091847424.thumb.jpg.3432f164432c8d3ae50b10553382dd34.jpg

 

First delivery of flour as a business: 

IMG_20200125_113615.thumb.jpg.92bcebe67679cc35aae53222c3cabfe8.jpg

 

Cheers

Mikey

 

Thanks, it does!  I didn’t realize that about most American rye bread being mostly white and mucho caraway—I must really love caraway, because I can taste the difference and I like it.  Wegmans has premade bread, an in-house bakery, and locally baked bread—their sourdough has three varieties, the miche (?) is fantastic!  That’s what made me ask.  
Also, yes, porn/salivating.

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On 1/26/2020 at 1:14 PM, Dusty Chalk said:

So if rye bread is all about the grain and sourdough bread is all about the yeast, why isn't there--or isn't there more--sourdough rye bread?

Bought this loaf of Sourdough Rye Bread yesterday at the Goleta farmer's market.   It's  from  Roan Mills Bakery in Fillmore, CA.

20200202_184758.jpg

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Amazing looking breads. 

Congrats on the new biz, Mikey.

My diet would suffer immensely if I lived nearby.  I'm a sucker for sourdough.   Droooooooooooool.....

 

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Friday - Bake Day for Sonja - Week 4 of Test Bakes for tafoni bakehouse -- getting closer - 4x4 different loaves. 

Still have paperwork and website work to go - and then setup equipment for the farmers markets.... inching closer.

 

IMG_20200214_111226.thumb.jpg.ce97608e6c031455df251bebe2f09346.jpg

 

IMG_20200214_084604.thumb.jpg.b5cbff5a3bc0ebf7eba20c57ec56f089.jpg

 

 

the breads --- 

Farmers

flour from Cairnspring Mills:
67% sifted Yecora Rojo wheat
18% whole-grain Expresso wheat

berries from Cairnspring Mills (home-smoked & milled):
15% smoked Gazelle rye

with honey, black pepper, and chocolate rye malt

 

Smoky Mocha

flour from Cairnspring Mills:
67% sifted Yecora Rojo wheat
18% whole-grain Expresso wheat

berries from Cairnspring Mills (home-smoked & milled):
15% smoked Gazelle rye

with honey, espresso, and chocolate chips

 

Rustic Rosemary

all flour from Cairnspring Mills:
80% sifted Yecora Rojo wheat
20% whole-grain Expresso wheat

enriched with honey and oil, flavored with rosemary
 

Yecora Rojo Sourdough

flour from Cairnspring Mills:
80% sifted Yecora Rojo wheat

berries from Cairnspring Mills (home-milled):
20% whole-grain Yecora Rojo wheat
 

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